Frequently asked claims questions

CTP claims

Any person injured in a motor vehicle accident in Queensland due to the fault (total or partial) of the driver, owner or another person insured by the at-fault vehicle’s CTP insurer.

See Who can make a claim for more information.

No. CTP insurance only covers personal injury resulting from a motor vehicle accident.

If you were the driver totally ‘at fault’ for the accident you will be unable to make a CTP claim for compensation and will need to rely on sick leave, Centrelink benefits, Medicare and the public health system unless you have other insurance policies such as income protection or private health insurance.

CTP insurers may offer limited additional benefits of at-fault driver cover for serious injuries or death. Contact your insurer for details on policy coverage and exclusions.

If you have a catastrophic injury and your motor accident was after 1 July 2016, you may be able to access treatment, care and support through the new National Injury Insurance Scheme Queensland.

The CTP insurer of the at fault vehicle.

If you do not know who the insurer is, call the Enquiry Line on 1300 302 568 with the registration number of the vehicle that caused the accident and the date of the accident.

See How to make a claim.

The Enquiry Line (Phone: 1300 302 568) can also provide general information on the Queensland CTP scheme and claim processes.

Yes. If you were a driver of a vehicle involved in the accident, you must report the accident in person to the police station nearest to where the accident occurred.

If you were not a driver of a vehicle involved in the accident, and you are unsure if the accident has been reported to the police, complete the Report of Traffic Incident to Police form(PDF 320 K) and post it to the police station nearest to where the accident occurred.

See How to make a claim for more information.

No. The CTP Medical Certificate must be completed by a registered medical practitioner such as a GP or medical specialist.

All claims for compensation are assessed individually. Your claim could include the cost of medical treatment, rehabilitation, loss of income, cost of care and support services and general damages (pain and suffering) if your injury is severe enough. See What can be claimed and How to settle your claim for more information.

All CTP claims are assessed individually and therefore vary in how long they take to settle. Claims involving minor injuries, where there are no issues about who caused the accident, usually settle more quickly than claims involving more severe injuries or uncertainty as to who caused the accident.

Yes. Strict timeframes apply regarding the lodgement of CTP claims. See Timeframes for more information.

You do not need a lawyer to make a CTP claim. You can deal directly with the CTP insurer about your claim although if your claim is complex or in dispute, you may choose to seek independent advice.

See Need for legal advice for more information.

If the CTP insurer advises you that they will pay for your treatment and rehabilitation needs or the insurer accepts liability for the cause of the accident, the insurer will pay rehabilitation expenses provided they are:

  • reasonable and appropriate,
  • related to your injuries from the accident and
  • are validated by original receipts.

Rehabilitation costs may cover physiotherapy, GP visits or return to work services.

See Rehabilitation and Treatment or the Road to Recovery brochure for more information.

Information is gathered by the CTP insurer to assist in determining the extent of your injuries, the treatment and rehabilitation you may require and to assess the level of compensation you may be entitled to receive.

Generally settlement of your CTP claim will occur when liability has been decided by the CTP insurer, your injuries are considered stable and the impact of the injuries is known.

See How to settle your claim for more information.

If a dispute about liability cannot be resolved through discussion with the CTP insurer or at a Compulsory Conference, you will have to take the matter to Court for resolution.

It will probably be in your interest to seek legal advice if this happens.

If you cannot complete all questions on your CTP claim form this may hold up your claim. You should make every attempt to try and obtain the information you don’t know.

This may include contacting the police officer(s) who attended the accident scene, talking to your comprehensive motor vehicle insurer (if you lodged a comprehensive motor vehicle claim) or speaking with the driver(s) of the other vehicle(s) involved in the accident.

If you cannot answer a question on your claim form, advise the CTP insurer why you can’t answer that question and what you have done to try to obtain this information.

Last modified 13 July 2016